Episode 5

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Published on:

9th Mar 2022

Good Feelings from Positive Words

Use positive words. Have a positive word ratio when you write and talk. Positive words come from the heart. Negative words come from the head anger center and self-thinking stress center. Think from the heart with kindness and giving. Think from the mind to be creative to help others and innovative to develop new products and services to improve people's lives. Be exceptional by being your true self. This is a new way of life for extraordinary living. 

Copyright ©2022 by Gary Epler, M.D. All rights reserved. This podcast is for general informational and educational purposes only and it is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

Transcript

Podcast #5

Good Feelings from Positive Words

Dr. Gary Epler – The new way of life is knowing who you are moment by moment which means know where you’re thinking from and that’s who you are. Think from the heart with kindness and giving. Think from the mind with creativity to help others and innovation to build products and services to improve people’s lives. Today we’re going to talk about the good feeling from thinking, writing, and saying positive words.

Joan – What do you mean?

Positive words come from the heart, and they feel good. Studies of conversations among families and workers show improved happiness and productivity when more positive words are used.

Why do positive words mean so much?

Positive words come from the heart. Negative words come from the head anger center and stress center.

Can you give an example?

Words like kindness, love, beautiful, giving, and trust all come from the heart with a good feeling. Words like angry, cruel, evil, jealous, and profanity come from the head with a bad, unhealthy feeling.

Joan – You’re right. Positive words feel good. What’s a positive word ratio?

A positive word ratio is number of positive words divided by the number of negative words. For example, if someone says three positive words for every negative word in a conversation, that’s a positive ratio of three. If someone says two negative words for every positive word, that’s a negative ratio of two.

What do studies about the positive word ratio show?

Surprisingly, the ratio needs to be high at three to five for positive, healthy feelings. If you have pleasant conversations, you’re both using three positive words for every negative word, a positive word ratio of three. A ratio below three has a neutral effect. As expected, a negative ratio causes stress in a conversation and can have serious consequences.

What do you mean, serious consequences?

Researchers counted the positive and negative words used by spouses and calculated the ratio. They found a positive word ratio of three to five was seen in happy marriages, but a negative word ratio was common among divorced couples.

Sounds dramatic. Why would negative words have such a bad outcome?

Negative words come from the head anger center and the head stress center when people are thinking about themselves. Close personal relationships are built on trust, giving, and people being their true selves. If people are using negative words from the stress center, they’re not thinking from the heart with kindness and giving to others.

You developed a positive word game, what is it?

It’s the positive alphabet word game. It’s simple. Think of a positive word that starts with A like amazing, B like beautiful, C like courage, and go through the alphabet. The letter X is hard for anyone to answer.

It feels good to play this game. I thought of the answer for X. It’s XOXO and means love! How does a positive word ratio help at work?

Researchers develop a device to measure the positive word ratio at work. They measure the ratio before and after people learn to stop thinking about themselves from the stress center. Findings show increased productivity and creativity when managers and employees have a higher positive word ratio.

How does this happen?

People learn to stop using negative words from the anger center toward other employees and the boss. They stop using negative words from the stress center like criticism, blame, and judgment. People can only think from one location at a time, so they no longer think from the head anger and stress center, but think from the heart with kindness and giving, and think from the mind for creativity to help coworkers or innovation to improve products and services.

Joan – Use positive words. They come from the heart and feel good. Do you have any closing comments?

Dr. Gary Epler – You’re right. Use positive words. Have a positive word ratio when you write and talk. Think from the heart with kindness and giving. Be exceptional by being your true self. This is a new way of life for extraordinary living.

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About the Podcast

Good Thoughts
New brain science, healthy thoughts, Dr. Gary Epler, Harvard Medical
Good Thoughts is about transforming your life into a high energy, creative, and enjoyable way of living.

Some people are stressed and disconnected from the community because they spend too much time being angry or in fear, and too much time having thoughts of self-criticism, self-pity, resentment, and taking from others. People need to know their true selves.

In 2019, Dr. Gary Epler discovered the connection between the new brain science and a new way of life referred to as the Eplerian Philosophy defined by seven words that will change the world. “Know who you are moment by moment.”

You know who you are at any moment because it's the brain region you're thinking from. Learn to transfer out of your anger center and your self-centered brain region for a healthier more productive life.

Learn to know who you are moment by moment to live your best life at home, at work, and in the community. Be exceptional by being your true self. Thrive on your uniqueness.

– Dr. Gary Epler
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About your host

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Gary Epler

Dr. Gary Epler is an internationally known Harvard Medical School professor, bestselling author, and opinion leader in health, peak performance, and leadership. He has impacted businesses and the lives of people throughout the world through his speaking, books, teaching and consulting. Dr. Epler is a successful serial entrepreneur as a founder and CEO of three companies. He has developed the "Eplerian Philosophy" a modern-day life philosophy for people to live their best lives at home, at work, and in the community.

Extended Bio: Dr. Gary Epler is an internationally known Harvard Medical School professor and opinion-leader in health, peak productivity and leadership. He is a bestselling author who has impacted the lives of people throughout the world through his speaking engagements, books, teaching and consulting. He has been called upon by individuals from around the globe who have a rare lung disease called BOOP that he discovered. He has developed the "Eplerian Life Philosophy" which is a modern-day life philosophy for people to live their best lives at home, at work and in society. This philosophy is based on brain science defined as “know who you are moment by moment.” This means stay out of your bad brain regions and stay in the good. Dr. Epler is a successful serial entrepreneur as a founder and CEO of three companies including a biotech company, a nutraceutical company, and a health management company. He is an award-winning speaker, addressing audiences about health, nutrition, productivity, and leadership.

Dr. Gary Epler has been recognized yearly since 1994 in The Best Doctors in America. He believes personalized health empowers people. He has written four health books in the critically acclaimed “You’re the Boss” series about people taking charge of their health including Manage Your Disease, BOOP, Asthma, and Food. Dr. Epler’s current book “Alive with Life. A Medical Doctor’s Guide to Live Your Best Life” about how to live an exhilarating life filled with high-energy, creativity, enjoyment, positive experiences and extraordinary people.

Dr. Epler discovered a new lung parasite in South America. He was at the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta where he chronicled the nutritional needs of North African children and managed the tuberculosis refugee program in Southeast Asia. He was Chief of Medicine and Board Member at the New England Baptist Hospital for 15 years. He has written more than 110 scientific publications and given more than 500 seminars and workshops around the world. He has more than 30K social media followers including one post with 200K+ views. In addition to conducting clinical and research work, Dr. Epler strives to educate. He became editor-in-chief of an internet-based educational program in critical care and pulmonary medicine offered by the American College of Chest Physicians. Business Week acclaimed him for his development of e-health educational programs that enable patients to manage their health and diseases. Dr. Epler was recognized as one of Boston Magazine’s “Top Doctors in Town.”

Dr. Epler ran several marathons including Boston, New York, and proposed to his wife, Joan at the start of the Paris Marathon; and for their first anniversary, they ran the original Greek marathon together. He delivered the 20th baby from a mother who named the baby after him. He’s been one of the Boston Celtics team doctors. He has taught medicine throughout the world and was fortunate enough to save a dying infant in South America from an overwhelming parasitic infection by using the sap from a fig tree. He is a radio and television personality. He is a Hollywood screenwriter and has written a medical thriller movie, medical drama TV show, and a lifestyle reality TV show. He is active in the community. He coached soccer, basketball, hockey, baseball, and club baseball at Boston College. He lives in the Boston area with his wife, Joan.