Episode 10

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Published on:

17th Aug 2022

Proprioception Is Lifesaving Balance

Understand the need for high-performing proprioception and balance, especially during older ages. Perform daily balancing exercises to prevent the fall in the middle of the night and other accidents. Live a healthy lifestyle and be your true self.

Copyright ©2022 by Gary Epler, M.D. All rights reserved. This podcast is for general informational and educational purposes only and it is not a substitute for professional medical advice.


Transcript

Good Thoughts Podcast #10

Proprioception Is Lifesaving Balance

Dr. Gary Epler – The new way of life is to know who you are moment by moment and be your true self. Know where you’re thinking from and that’s who you are. We’re going to apply this to proprioception, which means the ability of your body to sense where you are in relation to your environment. It’s about body position.

Joan – Is proprioception the same as keeping your balance?

Yes. It’s keeping your balance at all times – walking in the street, going in and out of stores, and especially going downstairs. There are too many headlines about people in their 60s and 70s falling downstairs hitting their heads sending them to the hospital and often worse.

That’s a tragedy that can be prevented. Proprioception is a long medical word, what does it involve?

There are nerve receptors in the muscles, tendons, and joints. These receptors transmit signals to the brain where they’re connected with the eyes and ear balance system to create a picture of the body position and movement.

Sounds like these receptors in the muscles and joints maintain balance. What are some examples?

I mentioned going downstairs as a major example. Others include walking at night in the dark without losing balance, and a simple one, being able to walk without looking at your feet.

What are the causes of losing proprioception?

There are some medical causes such as congenital disorders, but growing old and aging is the biggest cause. The strength of proprioception begins to diminish during the 30s and accelerates in the 60s. Lack of sleep is also a cause, especially with advanced age.

How can these tragic stories about people falling downstairs be prevented?

Two things. First, live a healthy life. This means a healthy nutrition lifestyle, eight hours of sleep every night, one hour of exercise every day, high level happiness, gratitude, compassion for yourself and others, learn something new every day, and be your true self.

What’s the second thing?

Special exercises for sharpening proprioception and balance. These include a wobble board or balance board, yoga, Tai Chi, or an exercise ball for balancing the abdominal and back muscles.

What balancing exercises do you do with the balance pad?

Purchase a foam balance pad from the internet or elsewhere. It’s firm foam about two and a half inches thick and a rectangle about 16 inches long and 13 inches wide. I like to do the exercises with bare feet, but you can use exercise shoes. I have the back of a chair in front of me to catch myself if I go off balance. Start with walking up and down on the pad, and then with both feet on the pad, rock your toes and heels back and forth and then side to side. Do sets of ten. Next stand on one leg and raise the other leg 90 degrees behind you. You can then do regular squats with both feet on the balance pad, and lateral squats with one foot on the balance pad. Then stand on one leg and raise the other leg 90 degrees in front of you. You finish with lunges with the front foot on the balance pad and back leg behind you, and repeat with the other leg in front of you.

Learn about proprioception and add balancing exercises as part of your daily exercise program. Do you have any closing comments?

Understand the need for high performing proprioception and balance, especially during older ages. Perform daily balancing exercises to prevent the fall in the middle of the night and other accidents. Live a healthy lifestyle and be your true self.

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About the Podcast

Good Thoughts
New brain science, healthy thoughts, Dr. Gary Epler, Harvard Medical
Good Thoughts is about transforming your life into a high energy, creative, and enjoyable way of living.

Some people are stressed and disconnected from the community because they spend too much time being angry or in fear, and too much time having thoughts of self-criticism, self-pity, resentment, and taking from others. People need to know their true selves.

In 2019, Dr. Gary Epler discovered the connection between the new brain science and a new way of life referred to as the Eplerian Philosophy defined by seven words that will change the world. “Know who you are moment by moment.”

You know who you are at any moment because it's the brain region you're thinking from. Learn to transfer out of your anger center and your self-centered brain region for a healthier more productive life.

Learn to know who you are moment by moment to live your best life at home, at work, and in the community. Be exceptional by being your true self. Thrive on your uniqueness.

– Dr. Gary Epler
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About your host

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Gary Epler

Dr. Gary Epler is an internationally known Harvard Medical School professor, bestselling author, and opinion leader in health, peak performance, and leadership. He has impacted businesses and the lives of people throughout the world through his speaking, books, teaching and consulting. Dr. Epler is a successful serial entrepreneur as a founder and CEO of three companies. He has developed the "Eplerian Philosophy" a modern-day life philosophy for people to live their best lives at home, at work, and in the community.

Extended Bio: Dr. Gary Epler is an internationally known Harvard Medical School professor and opinion-leader in health, peak productivity and leadership. He is a bestselling author who has impacted the lives of people throughout the world through his speaking engagements, books, teaching and consulting. He has been called upon by individuals from around the globe who have a rare lung disease called BOOP that he discovered. He has developed the "Eplerian Life Philosophy" which is a modern-day life philosophy for people to live their best lives at home, at work and in society. This philosophy is based on brain science defined as “know who you are moment by moment.” This means stay out of your bad brain regions and stay in the good. Dr. Epler is a successful serial entrepreneur as a founder and CEO of three companies including a biotech company, a nutraceutical company, and a health management company. He is an award-winning speaker, addressing audiences about health, nutrition, productivity, and leadership.

Dr. Gary Epler has been recognized yearly since 1994 in The Best Doctors in America. He believes personalized health empowers people. He has written four health books in the critically acclaimed “You’re the Boss” series about people taking charge of their health including Manage Your Disease, BOOP, Asthma, and Food. Dr. Epler’s current book “Alive with Life. A Medical Doctor’s Guide to Live Your Best Life” about how to live an exhilarating life filled with high-energy, creativity, enjoyment, positive experiences and extraordinary people.

Dr. Epler discovered a new lung parasite in South America. He was at the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta where he chronicled the nutritional needs of North African children and managed the tuberculosis refugee program in Southeast Asia. He was Chief of Medicine and Board Member at the New England Baptist Hospital for 15 years. He has written more than 110 scientific publications and given more than 500 seminars and workshops around the world. He has more than 30K social media followers including one post with 200K+ views. In addition to conducting clinical and research work, Dr. Epler strives to educate. He became editor-in-chief of an internet-based educational program in critical care and pulmonary medicine offered by the American College of Chest Physicians. Business Week acclaimed him for his development of e-health educational programs that enable patients to manage their health and diseases. Dr. Epler was recognized as one of Boston Magazine’s “Top Doctors in Town.”

Dr. Epler ran several marathons including Boston, New York, and proposed to his wife, Joan at the start of the Paris Marathon; and for their first anniversary, they ran the original Greek marathon together. He delivered the 20th baby from a mother who named the baby after him. He’s been one of the Boston Celtics team doctors. He has taught medicine throughout the world and was fortunate enough to save a dying infant in South America from an overwhelming parasitic infection by using the sap from a fig tree. He is a radio and television personality. He is a Hollywood screenwriter and has written a medical thriller movie, medical drama TV show, and a lifestyle reality TV show. He is active in the community. He coached soccer, basketball, hockey, baseball, and club baseball at Boston College. He lives in the Boston area with his wife, Joan.